Book Size: 5.5" x 10.75"

Pages: 32

Format: Hardback

ISBN: 9781566560399

Imprint: Crocodile Books

Edition: 1

Illustrated by: Joan Rankin

Illustrations: full-color illustrations

Ages: 3 to 8

Release date: Fall 2017

Category:

This is the Chick

By • Illustrated by Joan Rankin

$ 17.95

“A humorous addition to any picture book collection and a great read-aloud that children and adults will love.” – School Library Journal

About this book

A humorous picture book that teaches children about African animals. 

A tiny guinea fowl chick hatches early one morning and lets out a "cheep." Find out what happens in the bush when the "cheep" is heard by all the African animals.

Written in rhyme by best-loved children's author Wendy Hartmann, this humorous story will enchant and entertain.

Brand:

About the authors

Wendy Hartmann has been writing for many years, with more than 40 children’s books published, including, most recently, The African Orchestra. Her work ranges from concept and counting, beginner readers, high interest/low vocabulary readers to picture books. Her books have been selected for honor’s lists and nominated for awards for writing and illustration.

Wendy lives in Cape Town, is married and has two daughters. In her spare time, she paints and has taken part in numerous exhibitions and has works in private collections in South Africa as well as overseas.

Joan Rankin has illustrated over 30 books for children, including the acclaimed The African Orchestra and This is the Chick. She received the South African HAUM Daan Retief Prize for Children’s Book Illustration in 1986 and the Katrine Harries Award for Children’s Book Illustration in 1991.

Reviews

“PreS-Gr 2- How does one tiny chick scare an entire community of ferocious animals? In Hartmann’s latest, a simple ‘cheep’ from a chick creates a frenzy in the African plains. The chick frightens the elephant, who alarms the kudu, who wakes the jackal, and so forth. Readers will enjoy following along to see the next animal and how they react. Overall, the book presents a subtle moral about rumors getting out of hand, similar to a game of ‘Telephone.’ Readers will love the rhythmic flow and rhyming patterns while learning about various animals that can be found in this habitat. Unique and fun watercolor illustrations give the text a playful atmosphere, perfect for reading aloud. VERDICT: A humorous addition to any picture book collection and a great read-aloud that children and adults will love.” – School Library Journal

“In ‘House That Jack Built’- style verse, the duo behind The African Orchestra describes what happens when scary animals get scared themselves. Rankin’s paintings of African wildlife give the pages richness and depth. Her animals- brushed in translucent colors, with finely traced hair and feathers- are simultaneously comic and handsome. A chick cheeps; its parent, whose majestic black plumage is set off by a teal head, glares. The chick’s cry terrifies all of the animals that hear it: “This is the kudu that lifted his horns…/ and P-R-I-C-K-E-D the monkey like Acacia thorns.” The monkey screams, the jackal runs, and pretty soon a savannah’s worth of creatures are stampeding into the house of the young ranger. Finally, an owl talks sense into the crowd. The story’s pace never flags, and the vision of powerful animals- even the lion- having to be calmed by an owl will make children smile. One oddity: the story takes place at night (explaining the animals’ confusion and terror), but the white backdrops of the spreads create a sense of daylight and sunshine. Ages 3- 8.” – Publishers Weekly “In ‘House That Jack Built’- style verse, the duo behind The African Orchestra describes what happens when scary animals get scared themselves. Rankin’s paintings of African wildlife give the pages richness and depth. Her animals- brushed in translucent colors, with finely traced hair and feathers- are simultaneously comic and handsome. A chick cheeps; its parent, whose majestic black plumage is set off by a teal head, glares. The chick’s cry terrifies all of the animals that hear it: “This is the kudu that lifted his horns…/ and P-R-I-C-K-E-D the monkey like Acacia thorns.” The monkey screams, the jackal runs, and pretty soon a savannah’s worth of creatures are stampeding into the house of the young ranger. Finally, an owl talks sense into the crowd. The story’s pace never flags, and the vision of powerful animals- even the lion- having to be calmed by an owl will make children smile. One oddity: the story takes place at night (explaining the animals’ confusion and terror), but the white backdrops of the spreads create a sense of daylight and sunshine. Ages 3- 8.” – Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Joan Rankin has illustrated over 30 books for children, including the acclaimed The African Orchestra and This is the Chick. She received the South African HAUM Daan Retief Prize for Children’s Book Illustration in 1986 and the Katrine Harries Award for Children’s Book Illustration in 1991.

Additional information

Author

Hartmann, Wendy

Edition

1

Inprint

Crocodile Books

Pages

32

Type

HB

Illustrations

full-color illustrations

Age

3 to 8

Release date

Fall 2017

Author Home

South Africa

Format

5 1/2" x 10 3/4"

Reviews

"PreS-Gr 2- How does one tiny chick scare an entire community of ferocious animals? In Hartmann's latest , a simple 'cheep' from a chick creates a frenzy in the African plains. The chick frightens the elephant , who alarms the kudu , who wakes the jackal , and so forth. Readers will enjoy following along to see the next animal and how they react. Overall , the book presents a subtle moral about rumors getting out of hand , similar to a game of 'Telephone.' Readers will love the rhythmic flow and rhyming patterns while learning about various animals that can be found in this habitat. Unique and fun watercolor illustrations give the text a playful atmosphere , perfect for reading aloud. VERDICT: A humorous addition to any picture book collection and a great read-aloud that children and adults will love."å – School Library Journal "å¢ "In 'House That Jack Built'- style verse , the duo behind The African Orchestra describes what happens when scary animals get scared themselves. Rankin's paintings of African wildlife give the pages richness and depth. Her animals- brushed in translucent colors , with finely traced hair and feathers- are simultaneously comic and handsome. A chick cheeps; its parent , whose majestic black plumage is set off by a teal head , glares. The chick's cry terrifies all of the animals that hear it: "This is the kudu that lifted his horns…/ and P-R-I-C-K-E-D the monkey like Acacia thorns."å The monkey screams , the jackal runs , and pretty soon a savannah's worth of creatures are stampeding into the house of the young ranger. Finally , an owl talks sense into the crowd. The story's pace never flags , and the vision of powerful animals- even the lion- having to be calmed by an owl will make children smile. One oddity: the story takes place at night (explaining the animals' confusion and terror) , but the white backdrops of the spreads create a sense of daylight and sunshine. Ages 3- 8."å – Publishers Weekly "In 'House That Jack Built'- style verse , the duo behind The African Orchestra describes what happens when scary animals get scared themselves. Rankin's paintings of African wildlife give the pages richness and depth. Her animals- brushed in translucent colors , with finely traced hair and feathers- are simultaneously comic and handsome. A chick cheeps; its parent , whose majestic black plumage is set off by a teal head , glares. The chick's cry terrifies all of the animals that hear it: "This is the kudu that lifted his horns…/ and P-R-I-C-K-E-D the monkey like Acacia thorns."å The monkey screams , the jackal runs , and pretty soon a savannah's worth of creatures are stampeding into the house of the young ranger. Finally , an owl talks sense into the crowd. The story's pace never flags , and the vision of powerful animals- even the lion- having to be calmed by an owl will make children smile. One oddity: the story takes place at night (explaining the animals' confusion and terror) , but the white backdrops of the spreads create a sense of daylight and sunshine. Ages 3- 8."å – Publishers Weekly

MainReview

"PreS-Gr 2- How does one tiny chick scare an entire community of ferocious animals? In Hartmann's latest, a simple 'cheep' from a chick creates a frenzy in the African plains. The chick frightens the elephant, who alarms the kudu, who wakes the jackal, and so forth. Readers will enjoy following along to see the next animal and how they react. Overall, the book presents a subtle moral about rumors getting out of hand, similar to a game of 'Telephone.' Readers will love the rhythmic flow and rhyming patterns while learning about various animals that can be found in this habitat. Unique and fun watercolor illustrations give the text a playful atmosphere, perfect for reading aloud. VERDICT: A humorous addition to any picture book collection and a great read-aloud that children and adults will love."å – School Library Journal