Book Size: 6" x 9"

Pages: 224

Format: Paperback

ISBN: 9781566567350

Imprint: Interlink Books

Edition: 1

Translator: Catherine Spencer

Category:

Disfigured

A Saudi Woman's Story of Triumph over Violence

By

$ 15

“I am trying as a Saudi woman to raise the awareness of unstable men who see women as inferior, who resort to violence, and who are abusive to women.” -Rania al-Baz, on 60 Minutes

About this book

Every morning for over six years, Rania al-Baz has been the smiling face of a family program on Saudi television.

She was a young, beautiful Saudi TV news anchor- the first woman to have such a job- when her abusive husband beat her into a coma and left her for dead. She remained in a coma for four days and later underwent thirteen operations to reconstruct her face. When she agreed to let horrifying pictures of her ravaged face be made public, her story sparked general criticism of Saudi culture. A month after the tragedy, the first Saudi research into domestic violence began at King Saud University in Riyadh. Rania's story subsequently appeared in the press all over the world.

Brand:

About the authors

Rania al-Baz had become one of the best known and best loved faces in her home country of Saudi Arabia. She was the presenter of a program called The Kingdom this Morning on state-owned television. She lives in Saudi Arabia. 

Catherine Spencer works as a French translator and specializes in nonfiction about the Arab world. She lives in Marrakesh, Morocco.

Reviews

“I am trying as a Saudi woman to raise the awareness of unstable men who see women as inferior, who resort to violence, and who are abusive to women.” – Rania al-Baz, on 60 Minutes

“I don’t feel like I’m a hero… I feel that no woman should be a victim to her husband, or a victim in any way. A woman should have the ability to choose her own destiny.” – Rania al-Baz, on The Oprah Winfrey Show

“I want to use what happened to me to draw attention to the plight of women in Saudi Arabia.” – Rania al-Baz, on BBC News

“Rania al-Baz’s autobiography traces her life from girlhood in Saudi Arabia to her high-flying career as one of the country’s premier female TV journalists by way of two calamitous marriages- the first ending when she was barely out of her teens, and the second with a severe beating from her husband that left her with a three percent chance of survival. This is the kind of lady you really, really want to root for. Al-Baz’s willingness to tell her story in a country in which women are primarily relegated to the kitchen and the bedroom… is an achievement itself, and her perspective on the world at large is nuanced. Al-Baz lucidly defends Saudi Arabia, its cultural heritage, and Islam, managing to cogently explain how a society in which women are at a significant disadvantage politically and socially is not synonymous with the promotion of violence against women. After pictures of her attack landed on the front pages of newspapers, Al-Baz was thrust into the role of spokesperson for women in Saudi Arabia. She has successfully put a much-needed spotlight in the problem of violence without attacking her country’s way of life, which won her support in all areas of Saudi society.” – Bust Magazine

About the Author

Catherine Spencer works as a French translator and specializes in nonfiction about the Arab world. She lives in Marrakesh, Morocco.

Additional information

Author

al-Baz, Rania

Edition

1

Inprint

Interlink Books

Pages

224

Type

PB

Translator

Spencer , Catherine

Author Home

Saudi Arabia & Lebanon

Subtitle

A Saudi Woman's Story of Triumph over Violence

Format

6"å x 9"å

Reviews

"I am trying as a Saudi woman to raise the awareness of unstable men who see women as inferior , who resort to violence , and who are abusive to women." -Rania al-Baz , on 60 Minutes "å¢ "I don't feel like I'm a hero… I feel that no woman should be a victim to her husband , or a victim in any way. A woman should have the ability to choose her own destiny." -Rania al-Baz , on The Oprah Winfrey Show "å¢ "I want to use what happened to me to draw attention to the plight of women in Saudi Arabia." -Rania al-Baz , on BBC News "å¢ "Rania al-Baz's autobiography traces her life from girlhood in Saudi Arabia to her high-flying career as one of the country's premier female TV journalists by way of two calamitous marriages- the first ending when she was barely out of her teens , and the second with a severe beating from her husband that left her with a three percent chance of survival. This is the kind of lady you really , really want to root for. "Al-Baz's willingness to tell her story in a country in which women are primarily relegated to the kitchen and the bedroom"is an achievement itself , and her perspective on the world at large is nuanced. Al-Baz lucidly defends Saudi Arabia , its cultural heritage , and Islam , managing to cogently explain how a society in which women are at a significant disadvantage politically and socially is not synonymous with the promotion of violence against women. After pictures of her attack landed on the front pages of newspapers , Al-Baz was thrust into the role of spokesperson for women in Saudi Arabia. She has successfully put a much-needed spotlight in the problem of violence without attacking her country's way of life , which won her support in all areas of Saudi society."å – Bust Magazine "å¢ "In the book , "Disfigured: A Saudi Woman's Story of Triumph over Violence" , you will feel as if you are living the fast paced story…From the very first pages , I was absorbed by the story of one woman's very difficult life in the desert kingdom of Saudi Arabia…This is not a story of male dominated Muslim repression , but instead a brave recounting of the struggles women must face , in any culture , against abuse , divorce , child custody battles and being downtrodden. Rania has proven that despite living under the veil with strict societal and religious restrictions , Muslim women can be a source of inspiration to women everywhere."

MainReview

"I am trying as a Saudi woman to raise the awareness of unstable men who see women as inferior, who resort to violence, and who are abusive to women." -Rania al-Baz, on 60 Minutes